Year

| 1996 199719981999 | 2000 | 20012002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 20102011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 |2016 |

2015 Journals

Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.2
Philippine Clinical Practice Guidelines on The Diagnosis and Management of Acute Bacterial Meningitis
PIDSP and CNSP Bacterial Meningitis Technical Working Group
Abstract:
Acute bacterial meningitis is defined as the inflammation of the meninges which is caused by bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumonia, Haemophilus influenza and Neisseria meningitides . In developed countries, the advent of vaccines for these organisms has significantly decreased the prevalence of bacterial meningitis. For developing countries like the Philippines however, uptake of the vaccines on a nationwide scale has yet to occur, thus a change in the epidemiology has been seen. From 2001 till 2010, meningitis has always been in the top 10 leading causes of mortality in children. Based on the Philippine Pediatric Society disease registry, out of the 934,633 cases reported from January 1, 2006 to August 31, 2010, there were 5,611 cases of unspecified meningitis.

 

Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.2
Manila Declaration on The Availability and Use of Health Research Information In and For Low- And Middle-Income Countries in the Asia Pacific Region
Asia Pacific Association of Medical Journal Editors 2015
Abstract:
We, the participants in the Joint Meeting of the Asia Pacific Association of Medical Journal Editors (APAME), the Index Medicus of the South East Asia Region (IMSEAR), and the Western Pacific Region Index Medicus (WPRIM) held in Manila from24 to 26 August 2015, in conjunction with the COHRED Global Forum on Research and Innovation for Health held in Manila from 24-27 August 2015, drawing on the Pre-Forum Discussions on HIFA from 20 July to 24 August 2015 “Meeting the information needs of researchers and users of health research in low- and middle-income countires” available at http://www.hifa2015.org/meeting-the-information-needs-of-researchers-and-users-of-health-research-2/ and the BMJ Blogs 20 July 2015 “How can we improve the availability and use of health research in developing countries? Available at http://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2015/07/20/how-can-we-improve-the-availability-and-use-of-health-research-in-developing-countries/
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.2
Childhood Immunization Schedule 2016
PIDSP, PPS and PFV Committee on Immunization
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.2
Position Paper on Combination Vaccine Shortage 2015
PIDSP, PPS and PFV Committee on Immunization
Abstract:
In 2015, the Philippines experienced a critical shortage of DTaP-containing combination vaccines for use in the private immunization program The situation is believed to be a result of several factors, including difficulties in vaccine production capacities and manufacturing, and increased global demand for combination vaccines. The shortage, currently affecting countries globally as well as in the ASEAN region, has directly impacted on the delivery of essential vaccines to our pediatric patients.
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.1
Improving the Quality Of Medical Writing of Trials in the Pidsp Journal: Adapting the CONSORT Statement
Cecilia C. Maramba-Lazarte, MD
Abstract:
The PIDSP Journal Editorial Team strives to make improvements in order to uplift its own standards and be at par with International Journals. One quick fix which did not require any additional budget, but would significantly improve the quality of manuscripts was to adopt standard reporting guidelines, in particular the CONSORT Statement.

 

Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.1
Comparison of School-Based and Home-Based Application of Permethrin Shampoo for the Treatment of Pediculosis capitis – A Pragmatic Cluster-Randomized Trial
Lady Diana Rose Laus-David, MD, Venus Oliva Cloma-Rosales, MD
Pediculosis, head livem permethrin, Pediculus humans capitis, pediculosis capitis
Abstract:
Background: Pediculosis continues to be a common yet neglected public health problem especially in children. Trials to test for effectiveness for head lice interventions are heterogeneous, and a recent systematic review recommended the use of cluster randomization and centralized administration (e.g. school) of permethrin for pediculosis trials.
Objective: To compare the effectiveness of a school-based to a home-based intervention using permethrin 1% shampoo in treating pediculosis capitis.
Methods: We conducted a pragmatic, cluster-randomized trial at the Makati Elementary School. All Grade Four students (n = 211), belonging to a total of of five class sections, were invited to participate in the study. Students with a known allergic reaction to permethrin 1% shampoo, with open wounds on the scalp, or were absent on Days 1 or 10 of the intervention period were excluded. The five class sections were randomized to receive permethrin 1% shampoo to be applied either in school, or at home. The students were classified as having none, light, medium, or heavy infestation prior to Day 1 and after Day 10 treatment. Prevalence, incidence, and treatment outcomes were measured.
Results: The baseline prevalence of pediculosis capitis was 58.4% General characteristics of students were similar between groups. No significant clustering in pediculosis at Days 1 and 10, had no incident cases and were limited to light infestation by Day 10, but no treatment success outcomes. The home-based group had increased prevalence by Day 10, poor compliance with Day 1 and 10 shampoo, incident cases, although it registered a higher treatment success rate.
Conclusion: Compared to standard home based intervention, a school-based strategy resulted in less incident cases (0% vs 37%), reduction in pediculosis severity (p = 0.007 ), and higher compliance (100% vs 58.3%). Control of pediculosis in this specific community is largely warranted because of its high prevalence rate of 59.7%
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.1
Prevalence of Healthcare-Associated Infections among the pediatric patients admitted at Philippine General Hospital, 2011-2014
Edilberto B. Garcia, MD, MScPH, Sarah R. Makalinaw, MD, Ma. Lourdes Bernadeth V. Manipon, RN, MSN
Healthcare-associated infection, nosocomial infections, infection control program, Pseudomonas infection, Klebsiella infection.
Abstract:
Introduction: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) continue to be a major public health concern throughout the world particularly in developing countries wherein prevalence rates range from 5.7%-19.1%.
Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of HAIs among pediatric patients admitted at Philippine General Hospital and to describe the trends of annual prevalence of HAIs in relation to infection control programs implemented.
Methodology: A retrospective study was conducted at the 145-bed capacity wards and intensive care units of the Department of Pediatrics, Philippine General Hospital (PGH) from January 2011 to December 2014 wherein HAI records from the database of the Section of Infectious and Tropical Disease in Pediatrics (INTROP) were reviewed. The following data were collected and encoded: (1) number of patients admitted in the different areas: Pediatric wards (Ward 9 and Ward 11), PICU and NICU; (2) number of patients who developed HAIs; and (3) microbial isolates, sites and antibiotic susceptibility results. Trends of yearly prevalence of HAIs in relation to infection programs implemented were determined, and the microbial isolates and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns were described.
Results: Among 30,032 pediatric patients at risk for HAIs and admitted from January 2011 to December 2014, the prevalence of HAI was 11.37%. There was a decreasing trend in the yearly HAI rates from 2011 to 2014 which coincided with implementation of infection control programs and hiring of a part-time infection control nurse in 2012. The prevalence of HAIs was highest at the PICU (15.17%- 27.81%) followed by the two Pediatric wards, ward 9 (9.03%-19.87%) and ward 11(8.75%-14.76%) and lowest at the NICU (7.52%-9.44%). Top isolates were Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia. Pseudomonas organisms were still sensitive to Ceftazidime, and Klebsiella to Meropenem.
Conclusion: The overall HAI prevalence during the 4-year study period was 11.37% (9.14% – 13.65%) comparable to those seen in developing countries. There was a decreasing trend of prevalence annually that coincided with the implementation of various infection control programs and the hiring of a part-time infection control nurse. The microbial isolates obtained vary per area but overall the same organisms were isolated during the study periods which were susceptible to the empiric treatment given.
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.1
Clinical Profile of Pertussis among Pediatric Patients Admitted at the Philippine General Hospital
Rosalia Belen F. Bonus, MD, Carmina A. delos Reyes, MD, Cleo Anna Marie E. Dy, MD, Ruth Alma Ramos, MD
Bordetella pertussis, pertussis, DPT vaccination, pertussis pneumonia, whooping cough

Abstract:
Objective: The aim of this research was to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, laboratory and microbiologic characteristics, complications and outcome of pertussis among pediatric patients at the Philippines General Hospital.
Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed which included pediatric patients with final diagnosis of pertussis, both clinical and laboratory confirmed, admitted from December 2012 to August 2013 at the Philippine General Hospital.
Results: This chart review included 28 pertussis patients highest in those aged 1-3 months (86%), females (57%) and from region 4A (57%). 26 (93%) had exposure to household members with respiratory symptoms and unknown pertussis vaccination status. Of those patients who were eligible for vaccination, only 24% received age- appropriate DPT vaccination.
Onset of illness varied from 3 – 56 days; majority The most common complications were pneumonia requiring mechanical ventilation (64%), ARDS (28%), seizures (21%), nosocomial pneumonia(11%) and myocarditis (11%). The average length of hospital stay was 7.4 days with 13 deaths or 46% case fatality rate. Deaths were attributed to respiratory failure due to progressive pneumonia and ARDS. Other contributing causes were arrhythmia, MODS, and septic shock.
Conclusion: Susceptible young infants acquire pertussis from household contacts with respiratory symptoms. Paroxysmal cough and cyanosis are common clinical features, with leukocytosis, lymphocytosis and thrombocytosis. High case fatality rate for pertussis was noted among these patients.
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.1
Population-Based Study of Measles and Vaccination Coverage in Baguio City, Philippines
Artemio M. Gonzales Jr., RN, MPH, Donnabel L. Tubera, MD, MPH, Purificacion Serna, RN
measles immunization, supplemental immunization activity, outbreak response immunization
Abstract:
Measles continues to be a major childhood illness in Baguio City considering that the Philippines is in the elimination phase die to continuous transmission among susceptible population. Despite a high percentage of anti-measles vaccination coverage, outbreaks have been reported.
Objective: The goal of this study is to describe the epidemiology o measles cases during 2010-2012 and relate it to the outbreak response immunization (ORI) and supplemental immunization activities (SIA) of Health Services Office.
Methods: It is cross sectional design utilizing data from Philippine Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (PIDSR) of the City Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit and reports from the Expanded Program on Immunization of the Field Health Service Information System of Baguio City. Simple descriptive statistical analysis utilizing frequency and percentage distribution was used to characterize the measles cases according to age, sex, case final classification and vaccination status.
Results: During the 3 –year period, there were 457 total suspected measles cases with history of fever, generalized rash, and either cough, coryza or conjunctivitis. Outbreak started in February 2010 and reached 97 suspected cases and eventually decreased after the ORI by March to April 2010. The mean age of the cases is 11.81+1064 years old, 1028 are aged from 0-8 months. Of this total, 105 (22.98%) were clinically confirmed, 66 (14.44%) were laboratory confirmed, 66 (14.44%) were laboratory confirmed positive for anti-measles IgM antibodies, 27,(5.91%) were epidemiologically linked to confirmed cases and 295, (56.67%) discarded non-measles cases. Among 171 laboratory and clinically confirmed cases, 33 (19.30%) did not received measles vaccination, 40 (23.40%) received 1 dose and 54.40% has unknown immunization status.
Conclusion: There were observed cases of measles that are out of age target of the immunization program which necessitates public health action. There is a need to revisit immunization programs and policies to address out of target cases.
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Journal 2015 Vol.16 No.1
Your Diagnosis Please: Fever and Rash in Mother and Baby
Ruth Faye Sengson MD, Ramsey James Barro MD, Brian Tiopengco, MD
Abstract:
B.S. was born live, full-term male, appropriate for gestational age, to a 40 year-old G2P2 (2002) mother via emergency repeat cesarean section CS). His APGAR score was 8 and 9 at 1 and 5 minutes. His mother had an unremarkable course of pregnancy with regular pre-natal checkups. She had no history of hypertension, diabetes, asthma, thyroid disease, and no exposure to smoke, alcohol or x-ray.
However, one day prior to delivery, his mother developed intermittent low to moderate grade fever (T: 37.6-38C) with accompanying maculopapular rashes over the trunk and abdominal area. There were no joint pains or body malaise. This progressed and persisted until a day adterm hence, emergency CS was done. Mother was discharged 48 hours after delivery afebrile but still with maculopapular rashes on the trunk and abdominal area.
Due to maternal fever, B.S. was admitted and worked up for possible early-onset neonatal sepsis. On his first hour of life, blood culture and sensitivity were done and he was started on Ampicilllin and Cefotaximine. His CBC revealed Leukocytosis of 25.36 with predominance of neutrophils (67) and platelet count of 246 (Table 1). He remained to have stable vital signs, thermoregulated, active and with good suck.
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Year

| 1996 199719981999 | 2000 | 20012002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 20102011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 |

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF:
Cecilia Maramba-Lazarte, MD, MScID

ASSOCIATE EDITORS:
Nancy Bermal, MD
Arlene Dy-Co, MD

EDITORIAL BOARD:
Gyneth Bibera, MD
Mary Anne Bunyi, MD
Elizabeth Gallardo, MD
Jonathan Lim, MD
Xenia Cathrine Fabay , MD
Fatima Jimenez , MD
Nanette Cuady-Madrid, MD
Carmina Arriola, MD
Arlene S. Dy-Co, MD
Maria Estrella Balao-Litam, MD, MBA-H
Belle Ranile, MD
Xenia Catherine J. Fabay, MD

JOURNAL MANAGER:
Rea Uy-Epistola